Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

An Unfortunate and Lengthy Adventure in Misdiagnosis

Fibromyalgia and homocysteine

with one comment

Here’s the connection between fibromyalgia and homocysteine.

Studies regarding the correlation between coronary artery disease incidence and abnormally high blood levels of the amino acid homocysteine have been appearing with increasing regularity. Relatively overlooked among the research articles is a recently published Swedish study, the results of which demonstrate consistently high homocysteine levels and low concentrations of vitamin B12 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients meeting established clinical criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia. […]

SAM is an important cofactor in the metabolism of central nervous system monoamine neurotransmitters, including dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. It has also been used successfully to treat both Fibromyalgia and depression. Unfortunately, SAM was not measured in the Swedish study.

Another explanation for high cerebrospinal fluid homocysteine levels was considered by the Swedish authors. Nitric oxide, which is an inhibitor of the enzyme that converts homocysteine to methionine, is produced as a result of inflammatory reactions. Most of the patients in the study, in addition to their neurological condition, had accompanying symptoms of viral or bacterial infections. Theoretically, the inflammation caused by these infections increased nitric oxide levels, which in turn increased homocysteine levels. Immune Support

Interesting. This may explain why I have had some positive results with my 1000mcg methyl-B12 tablets. I wonder if we should reduce nitric oxide levels? And if so, how?

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Written by alienrobotgirl

19 April, 2006 at 10:59 am

One Response

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  1. […] wonder if too much nitric oxide is a problem, particularly as an inhibitor of the enzyme that converts homocysteine to methionine, as per my last post. The fact that ADMA is produced in the presence of SAM (derived from […]


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