Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

An Unfortunate and Lengthy Adventure in Misdiagnosis

Aspie Quotient

with 2 comments

So Steph pointed out to me last November that I could well be an aspie. I mused on it for a while and decided I probably had what are called shadowings of asperger’s – in other words you score very highly on the tests but don’t quite have the full blown syndrome. I’ve been musing over it ever since.

A couple of weeks ago I came across an online asperger’s test. I’d hitherto regarded taking the tests as pointless, as your preconceived opinion influences how you perceive yourself and answer the questions. But I thought what the hell. It was a bit of a bombshell to get the results. After I got the results I got into a glitch of having to try every different online test. Here they all are:

AQ Test

Example scores:

32-50 Scores over 32 are generally taken to indicate Asperger’s Syndrome or high-functioning autism, with more than 34 an “extreme” score.
24 Average math contest winner
21 Average male or female computer scientist
19 Average male scientist, and average male or female physicist
18 Average man
17 Average female scientist
15 Average woman, and average male or female biologist

I got 38. I panicked and took the test again trying to water down my results. I managed to revise it down to 35.

Aspie Quiz

Trait group Score Judgement
Motor difficulty 7.1 Above average
Perception difference 9.8 Above average
Aspie talent 9.9 Above average
Aspie disability 9.7 Above average
Social difference 9.5 Above average
Aspie instinct 9.3 Above average
Aspie communication 8.8 Above average
Neurotypical communication difficulty 8.7 Above average

Your Aspie score: 184 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 18 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie.

The Geek Test

Your score suggests possible Asperger’s syndrome. You scored 35.

Empathy versus systemizing (Baron Cohen’s tests)

Systemizing quotient test

Example scores:

0 – 19 = low
20 – 39 = average (most women score about 24 and most men score about 30)
40 – 50 = above average (most people with Asperger Syndrome or high-functioning autism score in this range)
51 – 80 is very high (three times as many people with Asperger Syndrome score in this range, compared to typical men, and almost no women score in this range)
80 is maximum

Your score: 60. I took the test again trying to tone it down and scored 67. Doh.

Empathy quotient test

Example scores:

0 – 32 = low (most people with Asperger Syndrome or high-functioning autism score about 20)
33 – 52 = average (most women score about 47 and most men score about 42)
53 – 63 is above average
64 – 80 is very high
80 is maximum

Your score: 20. I took this again trying to tone down some of my answers and somehow failed to do that and scored a 12. Doh. Maybe it’s broken or something, or I was being careless… I wonder whether my self perception has been warped over this aspect of my personality in the last year. I can’t be neutral in answering these questions. My confidence about my social skills took a knock last year when I discovered my one/only close friend was on a totally different wavelength to the one I thought she was on and we fell out.

Autism Spectrum quotient test

Example scores:

0 – 10 = low
11 – 22 = average (most women score about 15 and most men score about 17)
23 – 31 = above average
32 – 50 is very high (most people with Asperger Syndrome or high-functioning autism score about 35)
50 is maximum

Your score: 42. On revision: 39

Mind in the eyes test

Example scores:

A typical score is in the range 22-30. If you scored over 30,
you are very accurate at decoding a person’s facial expressions
around their eyes. A score under 22 indicates you find this quite difficult.

Your score: 29. After doing so badly on the other tests, I was pleasantly surprised to do so well on this test. I felt I was guessing on a few of the images!

Even though I’m skeptical of this kind of testing, getting these test scores made it all real. Should I get a proper diagnosis, speak to a doctor? I really feel it would help my parents to understand me, and perhaps help to repair the poor relationship I have with my mother. It would help several other members of my family, particularly an uncle. It would give me the authority to speak out. Maybe.

But I’m afraid too. I’ve heard many stories of people with asperger’s syndrome having their babies taken away from them, for the most outrageous reasons – one merely because social workers argued the woman in question was “more likely to get post natal depression” than a neurotypical. That’s the level of prejudice that exists. Never mind that the best parent an aspie child can have is an aspie parent. I decided a long time ago that if one day I should have children like myself, I would not send them to school to be bullied like I was – yet I know of a case of an Asperger’s child being forcibly adopted because his parents refused to send him to state school because the poor child couldn’t cope there. Social workers are generally patronising, arrogant and dangerous to autistics. I’m not sure I want anyone in a position of power to know anything about me.

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Written by alienrobotgirl

28 July, 2007 at 8:27 pm

Posted in Asperger's Syndrome

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2 Responses

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  1. Have you heard of waldorf schools? I wonder how Aspies would go there?We have them here in Australia too: http://www.steinerwaldorf.org.uk/education.htm

    Sherrie

    13 August, 2007 at 11:23 am

  2. Good idea. I think somewhere like a waldorf school would have helped a lot, particularly as the children there are bound to be a lot nicer. I’m not sure the unstructured approach would be ideal for autistics though. I think in a perfect world, children with aspergers should go to schools designed by other aspies. They’d have special confidence/social coping/communication lessons, but more importantly they’d be taught to use their pattern-spotting, systemising, spacial or creative skills in a rigorous way in order to realise their full potential.

    Alien Robot Girl

    14 August, 2007 at 3:50 pm


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