Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

An Unfortunate and Lengthy Adventure in Misdiagnosis

Enzyme kinetics

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The below quotes are from a few online primers in enzyme kinetics. I highly recommend them.

[A]ctivity of enzymes is strongly affected by changes in pH and temperature. Each enzyme works best at a certain pH (left graph) and temperature (right graph), its activity decreasing at values above and below that point. Enzymes

As the temperature rises, molecular motion – and hence collisions between enzyme and substrate – speed up. But as enzymes are proteins, there is an upper limit beyond which the enzyme becomes denatured and ineffective.

[…]

[A]symptote represents the maximum velocity of the reaction, designated Vmax. Enzyme Kinetics

[U]nlike normal chemical reactions, enzymes are saturable. This means as more substrate is added, the reaction rate will increase, because more active sites become occupied. This can continue until all the enzyme becomes saturated with substrate and the rate reaches a maximum. The two most important kinetic properties of an enzyme are how quickly the enzyme becomes saturated with a particular substrate, and the maximum rate it can achieve. Enzyme Kinetics Wiki

I’m posting the above quotes because I recently got into a ridiculous argument with a self-styled ‘expert’ who denied that genetics could be involved in food chemical intolerance because “the activity of enzymes is tightly regulated in the body.” Troll.

Enzymes are saturable. They have a maximum capacity. If two different people each have a different version of an enzyme, one of which is more efficient at converting the substrate than the other, then that person will have a higher tolerance for the substrate than the other person, because under maximum capacity conditions the substrate is removed faster.

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Written by alienrobotgirl

22 April, 2008 at 4:15 pm

Posted in The Science of FCI

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